sisterkyleightylernagoyajapan

Sister Kyleigh Tyler is serving an LDS mission in Nagoya Japan

Week 11–80 Days!! & Futons

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Futons & bedroom

Hello family and friends! I have been on my mission for 80 days! I can`t even believe that I`ve been on my mission for that long, but every day is such a blessing. Japan is amazing – the people here are so incredible – even when they say no, they are so happy and respectful. Japan is beautiful and I love being a missionary.

So here is what the week has been like.

Monday; grocery shopping in Japanese – not easy. Every day I am so grateful that I have a fluent trainer.  We taught the K family again, which was really fun. We did a mock FHE with them. F. San`s other daughter is 15 and hasn’t had any interest in the church, but she came out when we started to play Uno, which was such a huge step for her. She is such a sweet girl and I really see her becoming a great member. Also, F. San is an amazing cook. Actually, lots of the Japanese people are amazing cooks.

Tuesday; We read the Book of Mormon with a less active named G. Shimai. I felt like a toddler because i cannot read fast. It is incredible to listen to natives read though – it sounds amazing!!! We also went tracting and found an older lady who wanted to hear the lessons, but she refused to give us her name. And we are meeting her in the grocery store parking lot. So i will keep you updated on how that goes. We visited members for the rest of the day in the rain. I bought a kappa that fits though, and it was swell. I also bought rain boots, and every time it rains i am so grateful for that. Biking in the dark is a little sketchy, but i haven`t wrecked yet 🙂

Wednesday; we visited a member that speaks ENGLISH!!! She’s actually Filipino, but she speaks great english. It was really fun. She lives out in the country, and it was a beautiful ride to her house. I decided that we aren’t exactly in as city as it could be, but there is a stunning lack of grass that makes everything here look like city, even in the country. We found a park the other day, and it was so out of place because it was all this green in the middle of concrete. We got home and may or may not have had a two minute water fight with the elders (they live in the apartment below us). Basically, they just succeeded in splashing our windows with water. So that was really fun. We teach English for our service, and we had Kodomo eikaiwa at the church. Little kids are crazy. We then taught adult Eikaiwa for the rest of the night. Lots of our members come and are supportive, but we also have a couple of investigators come.

Thursday: we taught a lady named M. San. She’s very smart and has been an investigator for a long time. She wants to be really sure about the gospel before jumping in, but she is really so sweet. And she loves missionaries. We had a tachiai (member present) as well, a couple. They basically helped me learn Japanese. We then taught English at a preschool. We taught the K’s again, and watched a movie about Christ. It didn’t work in Japanese and so we watched it in Spanish. F. San is from Peru, so she understood, but the rest of us were lost.

Friday: We had a lesson with a lady named K. San. She’s really awesome. She another one that just wants to be really sure of her decision before getting baptized. She asked me why i was on a mission and why I was Mormon and it was so incredible. I wished that Japanese wasn’t a problem, because I felt the spirit so strongly as I talked with her, and I hope that she did too. I told her how blessed I was by living the gospel and that i wanted to share it with others. I told her about how even though I was born into the church, I still did exactly what we were asking her to do – read the Book of Mormon and pray about it. I told her it was a process for me to gain my testimony and that it would be for her too. But it is so worth the effort that is put into it. It was so great to talk to her, and i hope we get to a point where she will get baptized. Friday nights are game nights at the church for the ward and new investigators etc. All missionaries in Nagoya are supposed to memorize a church phrase book (we call it the Ninja). It’s really long, and we have to do it with our trainer and with members, so I spent game night passing stuff off to members. One member – N. Kyodai – taught me a bunch of other words, and I was trying to remember them because everything in Japanese sounds the same. So I memorized this: yubi kubi kata kita which is finger, neck, shoulder, north. And we both found that hysterical because it makes no sense in English or in Japanese. Something i’m so grateful for though is the love that the members have for missionaries and how much they love “beanchans”. I’m so grateful that they all want to help me with japanese. It makes me realize how many teachers and trainers I actually have. It’s amazing.

Saturday: H. Shimai – a member- took us out for a lunch lesson. We had sushi, which was so good, but she would not stop ordering food. It’s super impolite in Japan to not eat everything that you are given, so we just kept eating. It was SO MUCH food. Also, Japanese sushi is way better than american. So that was an adventure. Then we went tracting in the rain to a mall. We housed too, and found a guy who thought everything was God. We had dinner with another member – the T’s, who also just love missionaries – and the elders were also invited. I did not understand anything. But that’s the fun of being new I guess. They were so sweet though and it was a lot of fun.

Sunday: The K’s were confirmed in Sacrament Meeting and I kind of followed the blessing. It was super good. We got a surprise. One of the youth brought a friend to church, and the friend is SUPER interested in the gospel. The bishop asked us to meet with her this week, and of course we said yes. She is such an incredible girl, and you could see how happy coming to church had made her and how much she needs the gospel. She is 18, though, and in Japan the adult age is 20. we can’t teach minors without parents permission, so we are hoping her parents with give it. The youth that invited her is also an incredible missionary and she is planning on serving a mission! I just love the church – it’s so awe inspiring to see people who have been prepared to hear the gospel.

Then we end to the Eki (train station) to dendo (missionary work). There is no possible way to not be awkward doing eki dendo. So we went up to this couple and it was super awkward, so Sister P was just like “hi, my friend is brand new to Japan, can she practice her Japanese on you?” and they said yes. So i guess if we are going to be awkward, we might as well jump right into it. The guy actually seemed way more interested than the girl. But that was our experience and the eki.

This is my thought for this week: I was reading in 1 Nephi 8 about Lehi’s dream and realized there are 4 groups of people mentioned. Group 1 Vs 17 people who didn’t enter the path Group 2 vs. 21-22 people looking for the path. Group 3 vs 24 people who enter then fall away Group 4 vs 30 people who endure all the way to the end and rejoice in partaking of the fruit.  As i was reading i thought about how the Iron Rod is representative of the word of God aka the scriptures. And basically, the end result of all of these people is how tightly they held to the iron rod. Group 1 didn’t even enter the path. Group 2 were looking, but couldnt find what they were searching for. Group 3 held to the rod but eventually fell away. Group 4 Continually held to the iron rod and didn’t fall away. The difference between group 3 and 4 is how tightly they held to the rod. I imagine group 3 holding with one hand, but also trying to be a part of the darkness around them. Maybe they held on only when they felt they needed the strength. Maybe the held on because Mom and Dad said they had too. Group 4 continually held onto the rod. I imagine these people clinging to the rod, focused solely on the tree in front of them. I hope i can be one of those people. The scriptures really do give us so much strength. I’ve realized that as we teach people who don’t speak much japanese or who don’t understand my japanese. The scriptures guide us. These people can learn the gospel no matter the language. I have come to LOVE the scriptures these past few week. I wish i had studied them the way i do now before my mission. I have gained so much more insight and appreciation for them. Sometimes i wish i could just spend all day reading them instead of just an hour. i hope my investigators can grow to love them as well. I’ve also loved reading the words of the prophets in the Liahona. And i’m so excited for General conference!

Some Japanese things: everything here is small compared to america. Everything. Streets, cars, houses, people. It RAINS. i don’t think i’ve every seen so much rain in my life. it’s beautiful though. I’ve eaten Nato. Look it up. It tastes about as good as it looks. (I thank my parents for making me eat things that i didn’t like. That is a skill that is coming in handy now.) (Especially since she had to eat NATO–HAH!!!)

I hope you all have a great week. I pray for you all the time (we pray a lot here). Being a missionary is hard, but i wouldn’t trade it for anything! The church is so true! Lots of love:

Sister Kyleigh Ann Tyler

Japan Nagoya Mission

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